Credit card safety

To help prevent fraudulent use of your card, here are steps you should take.

  1. Check your Credit Cards accounts often. Reviewing your recent account activity is fundamental to credit card safety—and it’s easy. You can do it online or by phone. If your credit card issuer offers email or text alerts about unusual activity, sign up to receive them.

    What to do if you suspect credit card fraud. Call the bank or financial institution that issued your card immediately. Your issuer may want to cancel your current card and issue you a new one. Check with your issuer to verify that your mailing address has not been changed. If you still have your card but fraudulent purchases have been made, call your issuer to report the fraud and request a new card. Also, contact the credit bureaus to let them know that fraud has occurred. A "Fraud Alert" message will be placed on your file. You should also request a copy of your credit report and review it carefully. Learn More
  2. Sign new cards as soon as you receive them.
  3. Keep your card account numbers and personal identification number (PIN#) in a confidential place.
  4. Check your cards periodically to make sure none are missing.
  5. Destroy and dispose of copies of receipts, airline tickets, travel itineraries, anything that displays your card numbers.
  6. Memorize your PIN.
  7. Check out unfamiliar companies by calling your local consumer protection agency.
  8. Don't provide information that you're uncomfortable giving.
  9. NEVER give anyone the password that you use to log on to your online account or Internet Service Provider.
  10. Don't provide financial account information unless you are paying for a purchase using that account.

WHY ARE CHIP CARDS MORE SECURE?

EMV, which stands for Europay, MasterCard and Visa, refers to a standard for cards equipped with computer chips. Rather than swiping the card, as you would for a card with a magnetic stripe, you insert the card into a terminal slot during a transaction and then remove it once the transaction is complete.

  1. The chip generates a unique, one-time code each time you dip your card at a chip-enabled terminal. Your purchase can only be approved with the chip-generated code.
  2. One of the biggest perks of EMV cards involves a higher level of security. Unlike the magnetic stripe on a card, which contains data that remains the same, EMV cards change with each transaction.  EMV cards are a great solution to the problem with skimming because they produce unique, 1-time tokens that a hacker can't reproduce. They're basically impossible to predict, and they don't work for more than 1 transaction. So, if a hacker gets your card number and clone the card, he or she can't use it at a retailer that accepts EMV.  
  3. The chip in your card is virtually impossible to duplicate. That means attempts by a fraudster to create and use counterfeit cards will be much harder.
  4. Consumers continue to have zero liability for fraudulent transactions.
  5. Keep in mind that EMV cards don't significantly improve security for online purchases, nor does the technology work when the ATM or point-of-sale terminal hasn't been upgraded, like at many gas stations, for example.

Avoid this scam: Card Cracking

In card-cracking scams, young adults (primarily students, newly-enlisted military, or single parents) are recruited to facilitate fraud against the bank. The perpetrators typically target consumers via social media and convince them to share their checking account information  in exchange for some type of a kickback – usually in the form of a counterfeit check remotely deposited into their account of which, the consumer is allowed to keep a portion of the funds. However, the fraudster often removes all of the funds before the bank determines that the check is counterfeit.  Fraudsters may also convince the student to provide them with their debit card, along with their PIN. The consumer is instructed to report the card as lost or stolen, thereby receiving protection via Reg E, while the fraudster withdraws the funds.

Recognizing fraud

  • Lost or stolen card.  Your card is lost or stolen and the card is subsequently used without your permission.
     
  • Non-receipt.  You did not receive a new or replacement card that was sent to you by your Issuing bank. You may have no idea that the card was missing until you receive a statement listing transactions not made by you.
     
  • Fraudulent application.  Your personal information is used to apply for a credit card. This type of fraud is often difficult to detect until the issuer receives a complaint from the consumer or the account goes into collections shortly after having been issued. If you're not a customer of the bank that issued the card, you may not know a card has been issued in your name until you apply for credit elsewhere and are denied because of a poor credit rating.
     
  • Counterfeit.  Even though the card is issued to you by your bank, transactions appear on your account statement not made by you. This could be an indication that a counterfeit card bearing your account number is in circulation and being used at the same time you're making legitimate purchases.
     
  • Account takeover.  While you're in possession of your card, somebody else posing as the cardholder "takes over" the account by requesting a replacement card on the same account, usually to be mailed to a different address. You would not know this has been done until you receive an account statement showing transactions not made by you or you fail to receive your monthly account statement.
     
  • No card present.  While you're in possession of your card, somebody makes transactions using the card number only, as in the case of mail orders, phone orders, or Internet transactions. You may not know this has been done until you receive an account statement showing mail/phone order or online transactions not made by you.
     
  • Other scenarios.  There are other scenarios that are classified as fraud, but don't fall into the described categories. An example would be the theft and subsequent use of balance transfer checks, which you may or may not have ordered from your bank. 
     
  • What to do if you suspect fraud.  Call the bank or financial institution that issued your card immediately. Your issuer may want to cancel your current card and issue you a new one. Check with your issuer to verify that your mailing address has not been changed.

    If you still have your card but fraudulent purchases have been made, call your issuer to report the fraud and request a new card.  Also, contact the credit bureaus to let them know that fraud has occurred. A "Fraud Alert" message will be placed on your file. You should also request a copy of your credit report and review it carefully.